William and Mary: “Hearth” Memorial to those enslaved

Dear Bruce —

Many, many thanks for passing this along. I feel a little better just reading it. In a "large, loose, baggy monster" of a memoir I finally finished during these existential COVID-19 times, I regretted I hadn’t been more assertive–as you were–about racial segregation at W&M during our senior "Flat Hat" year. Passing it off as youthful myopia doesn’t really work for me.

In filling out the recent W&M renaming form, I asked the committee to consider whether the fact Ole Miss (and Centre College) could integrate in 1962 had something to do with Paschall’s role in Virginia’s "Massive Resistance" program in the late ’50s.

I’ll pass this along to Steve Mosier, who joined me carrying a sign "William and Mary Honors Martin Luther King, Jr." during his "I have a dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial just before we began our senior year.

Kentucky news: Sandy & I aren’t convinced Amy McGrath can actually beat Mitch McConnell in November–but Amy’s now polling within a few points of the Trump turtle/lapdog, causing McConnell to spend massively on advertising here that would otherwise go to Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, etc. We’d planned on finally returning to Williamsburg before a family reunion in June, maybe even surprising Crow & Carol Ann. It is what it is.

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William and Mary: “Hearth” Memorial to those enslaved

[Kincey and Bruce were 1964 graduates of W&M; they were married in Wren Chapel in 1966. Bruce was threatened with expulsion from the College (“or any other institution of higher learning in the State of Virginia. . .”) if he wrote anything about the integration of the College in 1963-64.


[The threat was issued by college president Davis Y. Paschall, who had been the Superintendent of Public Instruction for the Commonwealth of Virginia during the period 1957-60, often known as “massive resistance,” when the state closed public schools threatened by federal court-ordered integration. Nice to see progress in the Old Dominion.]

From The Washington Post: Education

William & Mary approves design for memorial to those the school enslaved

A rendering of the Memorial to African Americans Enslaved by William & Mary in Williamsburg, Va.

A rendering of the Memorial to African Americans Enslaved by William & Mary in Williamsburg, Va. (Baskervill/William & Mary)
By Joe Heim August 25, 2020 at 7:14 p.m. EDT

At least 180 individuals were enslaved by William & Mary from the college’s founding in 1693 until the Civil War. Some were owned by the institution for most or all of their lives. On Tuesday, the school approved a final design for a memorial to them and announced that it had secured all of the funding for the project.

The memorial, titled “Hearth,” resembles a large, brick fireplace and will include the names of those men, women and children known to have been enslaved by the university in Williamsburg, Va. The design, created by the architectural firm Baskervill, is based on a concept submitted by William Sendor, who graduated from the school in 2011.

Sixteen feet wide, 45 feet long and 20 feet high and located on the south side of the Wren Building — the oldest building on campus — the memorial is intended as a gathering place for students and visitors to reflect on the school’s past.
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“The final concept design has the gravitas we sought. It gives dignity and presence to those who were enslaved by William & Mary and whose labor built the university — without romanticizing that painful history,” President Katherine A. Rowe said in a statement. “In the process of refining the design, we recognized that the memorial site will reimagine the Jamestown Road entrance to campus. Both symbolically and actually, the first step for many on campus will be through this more forthright telling of our history.”

Work on the memorial, which will cost $2 million, is expected to begin early next year and be completed by October 2021.

A powerful new memorial to U-Va.’s enslaved workers reclaims lost lives and forgotten narratives

Sendor, whose entry was one of more than 80 designs submitted for the memorial, told The Washington Post last year that he created his hearth design because it brought people together and because he was inspired “to figuratively illuminate the forgotten history and memory of these enslaved people who sacrificed and contributed immeasurably to William & Mary for over half of the College’s history, and then to physically illuminate a shared space for community gathering and reflection for generations to come.”
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The push for a memorial, and for William & Mary to more closely examine its history of slavery, began in 2007 as an effort by student leaders to demand acknowledgment and accountability. Two years later, the school created the Lemon Project, named after a man who had been enslaved at the school, to research and report on William & Mary’s legacy of slavery.

In a statement Tuesday, Jody Allen, director of the Lemon Project and assistant professor of history, acknowledged the 2007 resolution by former students Tiseme Zegeye, Richael Faithful and Justin Reid that led to the memorial and said she hoped “it inspires current Student Assembly senators to move their ideas forward despite not being able to imagine the outcome.”

Their work, she said, led to “the uncovering of a more complete history of this 327-year-old institution, and soon a memorial to those known and unknown African Americans who played a vital role in the establishment and maintenance of the university.
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“The women, children and men who toiled here without remuneration for 172 years will not be forgotten again. Indeed, this grand and beautiful addition to the campus will be a constant reminder of their lives and their contribution to this community.”

William & Mary unveils design for memorial to enslaved people who worked on campus

Reid, who is now director of community initiatives at Virginia Humanities, said he was excited to learn about the final approval for the memorial and believes it will be a powerful addition to the campus that can’t be overlooked and will have resonance today.

“This isn’t a memorial just to the enslaved people at William & Mary,” he said. “To me, it’s a memorial to their legacy, to what they persevered through and what their descendants persevered through and accomplished.”

Susan Svrluga contributed to this report.

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Zoom Glitch Hints at Depth of post-Covid Lifestyle Changes

Washington Post: Business
Zoom went down for hours, disrupting schools and businesses
The outages hit remote workers and online classrooms reliant on the videoconferencing platform

Zoom has become a crucial part of life for schools, businesses and organizations since the pandemic. In this image, members of the Vermont House of Representatives convened a parliamentary session in April on the videoconferencing network.

By Hamza Shaban
August 24, 2020 at 4:43 p.m. EDT

Zoom outages disrupted meetings and classes around the country Monday, highlighting Americans’ growing reliance on video software to keep things running during the pandemic.

After roughly four hours, the company confirmed it had resolved an issue that kept some users from being able to join Zoom meetings and webinars. “We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience,” the company said in a statement.

Zoom first said it was experiencing partial outages on its status page, which it began investigating before 9 a.m. Eastern time. It’s unclear how many users were affected; clients in North America and parts of Europe have reported problems, according to the website Downdetector. The platform was back in working order by midday.

Zoom and other videoconferencing tools have become crucial during the public health crisis, a form of connection for business, school and social groups when face-to-face interactions are discouraged or prohibited because of the coronavirus. Its stock has more than tripled since the beginning of the year.

Zoom does not disclose the total number of daily active users on its service, a key metric that technology companies and analysts use to measure the size and growth of a platform. But the company reported in April that it has 300 million daily meeting participants, although people in multiple meetings could be counted more than once by that metric. By comparison, Google Meet claims more than 100 million daily meeting participants. And Microsoft reported in the spring that its communications platform Teams has 75 million daily active users.

The surge in video conferencing underscores the massive shift to working from home that has been greatly accelerated by the pandemic. In 2010, less than 10 percent of American workers worked at least part time from home, the Census Bureau found. Now, according Stanford economics professor Nicholas Bloom, a remarkable 42 percent of the U.S. labor force works from home full time.

“It really shows just how important this kind of technology is and how this technology has, generally speaking, enabled us to pretty seamlessly transition to working from home,” said Julie Samuels, executive director of Tech: NYC, a group that represents New York-based technology firms. “If the pandemic had struck even 10 years go, it’s inconceivable how we would have functioned, and I think this morning kind of indicated that.”

She cautioned, however, that no matter how great the technology is, there are inherent limitations, especially when it comes to simulating in-person collaboration, like in classrooms for young children. Essential service workers employed by grocery stores and hospitals also don’t have the option of working from home.

Zoom’s technical issues interrupted the first day of virtual classes for many schools, colleges and universities. Since the pandemic shuttered campuses in March, the platform has been adapted by educators who teach everyone from squirmy preschoolers to doctoral students.

Atlanta Public Schools, which has more than 50,000 students, was set to start the school year virtually Monday, but struggled with Zoom problems. So did Durham Public Schools in North Carolina and Pennsylvania State University, which has nearly 100,000 students. All told, more than 100,000 K-12 schools use Zoom at no cost for online learning.

“We have resolved an issue that caused some users to be unable to start and join Zoom Meetings and Webinars or manage aspects of their account on the Zoom website,” Zoom said. On social media the company has been responding to people’s complaints with similar messages.

Zoom’s phone and chat services were not impacted by the outages, the company noted. The disruption was tied to an authentication problem with the company’s website.

As with previous outages of office productivity software, like the workplace chat service Slack, the disruption was met with frustration but also exuberance. Without Zoom, there can be no meetings, at least some people hoped. And as working, learning and socializing from home has dragged on for many Americans, so has the burden of appearing “camera-ready,” of having strangers gaze into people’s most intimate spaces, and of carrying on simulated social interactions without physical and tactile feedback, which can be exhausting in its own way.

Staff writer Moriah Balingit contributed to this report.
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Hamza Shaban
Hamza Shaban is a technology reporter for The Washington Post. Previously, he covered tech policy for BuzzFeed. Follow

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Virgin Islands Daily News: Caneel Bay 081820

Fascinating article about the current status of Caneel Bay, the former keystone property of the Rockefeller family owned RockResorts, linked directly to Laurance Rockefeller’s acquisition of the St. John properties that were donated to the US Government to become the Virgin Islands National Park.

The second lesson in this article is the long time disruptions which are on-going from the hurricane devastation of Irma and Maria, THREE years ago, 2017.

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Elements of a new model for small island tourism promotion

This article from the Washington Post <https://www.washingtonpost.com/travel/tips/these-countries-are-accepting-american-travelers-remote-work-trips/?utm_campaign=wp_by_the_way&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_bytheway > may offer ideas for small islands with low Covid-19 infection rates.

These 4 countries are accepting American travelers for remote-work trips
Digital nomads don’t have many options during the pandemic, but a few nations are welcoming working travelers.

By Natalie B. Compton
July 27

The pandemic has proved challenging for digital nomads, people who travel the world working remotely. With countries closing their borders and air travel heavily restricted, working abroad has become extremely difficult if not totally impossible for Americans.

And as some destinations begin to allow foreign visitors, travelers from the United States may still be banned because of the America’s escalating number of coronavirus cases.

But there are exceptions. While the State Department and health officials still recommend Americans avoid all international travel, some countries are welcoming working travelers, including Americans, back again despite the pandemic’s continuing spread.

[With the pandemic shutting borders, digital nomads find it harder to roam]
Estonia

Launching on Aug. 1 after years of development, the Republic of Estonia’s digital nomad visa will allow foreigners to stay in Estonia for up to a year.

Applicants must have a gross monthly salary of 3,000 euros (about $3,530) or more from a remote work job to be considered for the visa, which is an extension of Estonia’s e-Residency program for foreign entrepreneurs.

“We saw that there was kind of a lack of opportunities for [digital nomads], so we wanted Estonia to solve the problem,” Ott Vatter, the managing director of e-Residency, told The Washington Post. “Estonia aims to be the hub for these kinds of new entrepreneurs that we see trending globally.”

Since the Estonian Parliament authorized the program in June, international applicants mostly from the United States, Canada, Russia and Asia completed the online request for either a Type C short stay visa, or a Type D long stay visa.

At this time, Estonia is not allowing Americans to visit the country for tourism, but they are allowed in for the purpose of work or study. On arrival, foreigners must quarantine in self-isolation for 14 days.

[Thinking about a remote-work trip? Consider these tips first.]

Barbados

Shortly after reopening its borders to international travel, Barbados launched a program that allows visitors, including Americans, to stay on the Caribbean island visa-free for up to one year.

Called the “Barbados Welcome Stamp,” the program was created to bring remote workers to the country.

“The aim is to attract remote workers, with a bill to be introduced in Parliament by the government that will remove the local income taxes that normally kick in after six months,” The Post reported.

The online application fee is $2,000 for individuals and $3,000 for families. Applicants must certify they earn an annual income of $50,000 or have the means to support themselves during their time in Barbados.

Those traveling to Barbados for remote work or pleasure during the pandemic must follow new travel protocols.

[Where can Americans travel to in the Caribbean?]

Georgia

On July 16, the country of Georgia announced a new program for foreigners to work remotely from the country.

“Georgia has the image of an epidemiologically safe country in the world and we want to use this opportunity,” the country’s minister of economy, Natia Turnava, said in a statement. “We are talking about opening the border in a way to protect the health of our citizens, but, on the other hand, to bring to Georgia citizens of all countries who can work remotely.”

Applicants must provide proof of employment and give their consent to quarantine in self-isolation for 14 days to be considered for the program. Applications should be available soon.

American travelers are not allowed into Georgia at this time unless they’re granted a long-term visa of at least six months, traveling for business with a special permit or are the spouse of a Georgian citizen.

Jamaica

Travelers from the United States are allowed to visit Jamaica. However, the entry requirements vary depending on their home state.

All Americans must have an approved Travel Authorization ahead of their trip, or they won’t be allowed to travel to Jamaica.

At this time, visitors from Florida, Arizona, Texas and New York are classified as high-risk states by the Jamaican government and are required to provide a proof of negative covid-19 PCR tests from an accredited lab to receive a travel authorization.

People who identify as business travelers in their Travel Authorization application will be given a test for the novel coronavirus on arrival to Jamaica.

“We have worked with IATA to ensure that it is a part of the airline check-in protocols that if you’re coming to Jamaica you have to produce this authorization,” said Donovan White, Jamaica’s director of tourism.

White says that while most travelers are given a 30-day visa on arrival, they can apply for a longer stay visa to enjoy more of what Jamaica has to offer digital nomads.

“There’s so much history and folklore around Jamaica. Anyone who is a nomad traveler … will be able to write a storybook about spending an extended time in Jamaica,” White said.

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What Small Islands Can Do, in a Post-Covid World

This article from the on-line Washington Post <https://www.washingtonpost.com/travel/tips/these-countries-are-accepting-american-travelers-remote-work-trips/ utm_campaign=wp_by_the_way&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter&wpisrc=nl_bytheway > highlights the kind of niche marketing that islands should be working to develop, given the relative safety of small islands.

These 4 countries are accepting American travelers for remote-work trips

Digital nomads don’t have many options during the pandemic, but a few nations are welcoming working travelers.

PCQZLPNC3VBERBPCVBZ2E2TJEQ.jpg

(Washington Post illustration)
By Natalie B. Compton
July 27

The pandemic has proved challenging for digital nomads, people who travel the world working remotely. With countries closing their borders and air travel heavily restricted, working abroad has become extremely difficult if not totally impossible for Americans.

And as some destinations begin to allow foreign visitors, travelers from the United States may still be banned because of the America’s escalating number of coronavirus cases.

But there are exceptions. While the State Department and health officials still recommend Americans avoid all international travel, some countries are welcoming working travelers, including Americans, back again despite the pandemic’s continuing spread.

[With the pandemic shutting borders, digital nomads find it harder to roam]

Estonia

Launching on Aug. 1 after years of development, the Republic of Estonia’s digital nomad visa will allow foreigners to stay in Estonia for up to a year.

Applicants must have a gross monthly salary of 3,000 euros (about $3,530) or more from a remote work job to be considered for the visa, which is an extension of Estonia’s e-Residency program for foreign entrepreneurs.

“We saw that there was kind of a lack of opportunities for [digital nomads], so we wanted Estonia to solve the problem,” Ott Vatter, the managing director of e-Residency, told The Washington Post. “Estonia aims to be the hub for these kinds of new entrepreneurs that we see trending globally.”

Since the Estonian Parliament authorized the program in June, international applicants mostly from the United States, Canada, Russia and Asia completed the online request for either a Type C short stay visa, or a Type D long stay visa.

At this time, Estonia is not allowing Americans to visit the country for tourism, but they are allowed in for the purpose of work or study. On arrival, foreigners must quarantine in self-isolation for 14 days.

[Thinking about a remote-work trip? Consider these tips first.]
Barbados

BO7C3PGOAUI6VGNQQQTOE3JAHM.jpg

Shortly after reopening its borders to international travel, Barbados launched a program that allows visitors, including Americans, to stay on the Caribbean island visa-free for up to one year.

Called the “Barbados Welcome Stamp,” the program was created to bring remote workers to the country.

“The aim is to attract remote workers, with a bill to be introduced in Parliament by the government that will remove the local income taxes that normally kick in after six months,” The Post reported.

The online application fee is $2,000 for individuals and $3,000 for families. Applicants must certify they earn an annual income of $50,000 or have the means to support themselves during their time in Barbados.

Those traveling to Barbados for remote work or pleasure during the pandemic must follow new travel protocols.

Georgia

(iStock)

On July 16, the country of Georgia announced a new program for foreigners to work remotely from the country.

“Georgia has the image of an epidemiologically safe country in the world and we want to use this opportunity,” the country’s minister of economy, Natia Turnava, said in a statement. “We are talking about opening the border in a way to protect the health of our citizens, but, on the other hand, to bring to Georgia citizens of all countries who can work remotely.”

Applicants must provide proof of employment and give their consent to quarantine in self-isolation for 14 days to be considered for the program. Applications should be available soon.

American travelers are not allowed into Georgia at this time unless they’re granted a long-term visa of at least six months, traveling for business with a special permit or are the spouse of a Georgian citizen.

Jamaica

6ASRMYGOAQI6VGNQQQTOE3JAHM.jpg

Travelers from the United States are allowed to visit Jamaica. However, the entry requirements vary depending on their home state.

All Americans must have an approved Travel Authorization ahead of their trip, or they won’t be allowed to travel to Jamaica.

At this time, visitors from Florida, Arizona, Texas and New York are classified as high-risk states by the Jamaican government and are required to provide a proof of negative covid-19 PCR tests from an accredited lab to receive a travel authorization.

People who identify as business travelers in their Travel Authorization application will be given a test for the novel coronavirus on arrival to Jamaica.

“We have worked with IATA to ensure that it is a part of the airline check-in protocols that if you’re coming to Jamaica you have to produce this authorization,” said Donovan White, Jamaica’s director of tourism.

White says that while most travelers are given a 30-day visa on arrival, they can apply for a longer stay visa to enjoy more of what Jamaica has to offer digital nomads.

“There’s so much history and folklore around Jamaica. Anyone who is a nomad traveler … will be able to write a storybook about spending an extended time in Jamaica,” White said.

Posted in Fun

The (Very) Sad State of Local Newspapers

In a state capital and county seat for 570,000 people, the Annapolis Capital-Gazette can barely manage to publish a 16-page edition, and of that, 1.5 pages are puzzles and 1 page is comics.

Doesn’t seem sustainable.

Posted in Fun

How to Read the News

Walgreens: Looting Cost $75 million — as reported by Bloomberg News

Walgreens: Looting Cost Five One-hundredths of 1 percent of 2019 Revenue or One-tenth of One Percent of Assets — the way we “communists” (otherwise known as Democratic voters) might describe it. Poor babies are bleeding to death.

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Too Often We Overlook the Extended Time Factors in Small Island Disaster Recovery (BVI)

from the BVI News < https://bvinews.com/three-years-later-loose-mongoose-re-opens-in-trellis-bay/ >

Three years later |
Loose Mongoose re-opens in Trellis Bay

on July 10, 2020 at 8:07 AM /

Amid a global pandemic and roughly three years after it was severely impacted by the weather events of 2017, local hot spot De Loose Mongoose has re-opened with improvements in Trellis Bay on Beef Island.

Human Resources Manager at Loose Mongoose Rochelle Lawrence told BVI News on Thursday that patrons can expect the same great food and a revamped ambience with added amenities.

“We have completely renovated the property, and I think it is about six times the size it was before. We were just left with the original structure, which was a one storey building. Everything else was completely gone,” she said referring to the hurricane damage to the facility.

“We now offer the amenities of a restaurant, an outside bar, an inside lounge, the upstairs is an open-top bar, we also have a boutique and a coffee shop. In addition to that, we will also have docks that we will be serving our marine customers with fuel. So everything that you will need in this little area,” she added.

Lawrence said that after a few unavoidable delays, the structure took roughly eight to nine months to complete and will officially re-open this coming Sunday.

“We are going to be full-blown open,” she stated, adding that they have been partially opened since last Tuesday.

In the meantime, Lawerence said the establishment offers employment to 14 staff, and that figure is expected to increase soon.

“Things are still a little bit slow coming out of the pandemic and maintaining social distancing has been quite a bit of struggle for us, so we have a bit of a skeletal staff. But we do wish to increase it very soon. We used quite a bit of staff that we had from before too,” she said.

Food, service

Meanwhile, well-known executive chef Neil Cline said patrons can expect to be delighted with their food offerings.

He said the restaurant has had “great reviews” on its cuisine so far.

“We are trying our Caribbean fusion. We are trying to offer a service to our people that is comfortable and a taste of what the BVI has to offer. It was a hefty investment, but it was an investment that was worthwhile. It will be even more worthwhile to see our people supporting,” he stated.

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Note to self —

Spend more time studying ducks than funnies

Bruce

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